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About Donation

We all have the power to make the gift of life and health possible for others through organ, eye and tissue donation. Learn more about the need, process, and more below!

What can be donated? 

Organs

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Heart

Lungs

Kidneys

Pancreas

Liver

Intestines

 

Ocular

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Cornea

Sclera

Whole globe

 

Tissues

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Blood Vessels

Bone & Connective Tissue

Heart Valves

Pericardium

Skin

What can be donated?

Organ

Uses

Benefits

Liver

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Chronic hepatitis with cirrhosis

Primary biliary cirrhosis

Biliary atresia

Sclerosing cholangitis. 

 

A transplant can allow patients to live a normal, fully functioning life after transplant.

Heart

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Severe coronary artery disease

Congenital heart disease

Dilated cardiomyopathy

 

Many heart transplant recipients lead long and productive lives.

Lungs

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary arterial

Hypertension

After a lung transplant, the majority of recipients have no limitations on physical activity.

Kidneys

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Chronic kidney disease

High blood pressure

Diabetes

 

Kidney transplant eliminates the need for dialysis treatments.

Pancreas

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Type 1 Diabetes with end-stage renal disease

 

A pancreas transplant can cure diabetes and eliminate the need for insulin injections after transplant.

Intestines

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Life-threatening complications from total parenteral nutrition (TPN)

Intestinal transplant recipients are able to transition to an oral diet and resume normal activities of daily living.

   Tissue

Uses

Benefits

Pericardium

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Pericardium

Repair defects caused by trauma

Neurosurgery

 

Promote healing

Enhance life

Blood Vessels

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Saphenous vein

Femoral vein

CABG procedures

Peripheral vascular disease

AV access

 

Restore circulation

Skin

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Skin

Burns

Abdominal wall injuries

Reconstructive surgery after mastectomy

Promote healing

Prevent fluid loss

Decrease infection and pain

Bone / Connective Tissue

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Femur

Tibia

Fibula

Humerus

Radius

Ulna

Hemi-Pelvis

Fascia lata

Tendons & ligamennts

 

Trauma

Fractures

Tumors

Degenerative bone disease

Dental surgery

Bladder sling procedures

Hernia repair

Sports injuries

 

Promote healing

Restore mobility

Prevent amputation

Eyes

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Cornea

Sclera

Whole globe

Cornea perforation

Pseudophakic bullous keratopathy

Keratoconus

Corneal degeneration

Corneal scarring due to keratitis & trauma 

 

Restore sight

Heart Valves

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Aortic valve

Pulmonary valve

Congenital heart disease 

Valvular heart disease

No rejection

No anticoagulation therapy needed 

Treatment of choice for children

Low risk of infection

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The Donation Process

Tap each step to read more about the Donation Process!

 

1. Referral

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2. Evaluation

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3. Authorization

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4. Family Discussion

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5. Donor Care

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6. Find a Recipient

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7. Recovery

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8. Family Support

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Frequently Asked Questions

Q. If first responders/medical professionals know I’m a registered donor, will they still work as hard to save me?

A. Your life always comes first. If you are sick or injured, the first responders’, doctors’ and nurses’ first priority is always to save your life. Donation is only considered after all life-saving efforts have been exhausted.

Q. Can I donate if I’m older and/or have medical issues?

A. Everyone should consider themselves a potential donor, regardless of age or medical conditions. Medical professionals evaluate each patient at the time of death and determine if a person’s organs, eyes or tissues are medically suitable for donation.

Q. Will my family have to pay for the medical costs if I am a donor?

A. Your family will never have to pay for costs associated with organ, eye and tissue donation. Costs related to donation are paid by the recipient, usually through insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid.

Q. If I donate, will I still be able to have an open casket funeral?

A. Throughout the donation process, heroic donors are treated with the utmost respect and dignity. Organs and tissues are recovered in a surgical procedure and all incisions are closed and dressed. Every effort is made to minimize changes to the physical appearance.

Q. How do I know if my religion supports organ, eye and tissue donation?

A. All major organized religions in the U.S. support or encourage organ, eye and tissue donation and view it as a final act of charity or love. Learn more about your religion’s position on donation here.

Q. Do I need to tell my family I registered?

A. Even if you are a registered donor, it is important to share those wishes with your loved ones. Your family may be asked to complete paperwork in order for donation to occur.